Pencils and Pixels: Drawing and Digital Media in Archaeological Field Recording

Isometric sketch from brilliant field archaeologist Michael House

It’s publication day! It’s publication day! I’m very pleased that after two years, six (!!!) peer reviews, and some hardcore image wrangling me and Dr Holly Wright’s publication Pencils and Pixels: Drawing and Digital Media in Archaeological Field Recording has finally been published.

It…is a monster. Weighing in at over 10,700 words, we examine the history of archaeological field drawing to better contextualize the emergence of digital (paperless) field recording and drawing. We reference literature in architecture and design to inform this transition to digital, and find that drawing performs several essential functions in understanding archaeological stratigraphy. From the article:

As drawing has persisted since the beginning of archaeological recording, remained important after the introduction of photography, is characterized as an essential mode of communication and knowledge production within archaeology, and features prominently within abductive reasoning during initial archaeological investigation, a complete abdication to digital recording should be a matter of intense consideration.

Getting the article out was a bit of a fraught process, having to retrospectively include literature that was published after submission (Mobilizing the Past: Recent Approaches to Archaeological Fieldwork in a Digital Age I’m looking at you) and trying to include actual field drawings–it was a real struggle getting pencil drawings on gridded permatrace to be high enough resolution, so I ended up having to digitize the drawing, then had to trace the drawing onto the included photograph to make it extra clear. Layers of irony in that one in the digital/analog back and forth. The editors were great though and really worked hard with us to get it out.

I was especially happy to publish with the esteemed Dr Holly Wright, as this formed part of her dissertation on digital field drawing. She’s a good friend and colleague and it’s always fun to publish with folks. I was also able to include drawings from some pretty legendary archaeologists, Michael House and Chiz Haward.

Elevation by Chiz Haward, showing his integration of analog and digital drawing

Chiz was especially helpful and contributed an amazing elevation that he created through both digital and analog drawing. We quote him at length in the article as his integrated workflow was especially informative to our argument. Illustrations from David Mackie and Ben Sharp also feature, as well as some lesser-known dudes such as John Aubrey, General Pitt-Rivers, Stuart Piggott and Mortimer Wheeler. (No women! That’s the subject of some current research, watch this space.)

Anyway, I’d be exceedingly happy if you read this and shared it widely and let me know what you think.

Morgan, C., & Wright, H. (2018). Pencils and Pixels: Drawing and Digital Media in Archaeological Field Recording. Journal of Field Archaeology, 1–16.

I’ll upload proofs in a bit, but let me know if you can’t access it and I’ll send it to you.

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Podcast: Cooking With Archaeologists

Tamsin & I in the field last March.

Dan, Tamsin and I went on the Cooking With Archaeologists podcast to chat about digital archaeology, research in Qatar and the Arabian Gulf and life in the field. It was lovely to speak to Colin and we contributed our super secret recipes for kebabs & a bonus recipe for baba ganoush:

Lamb Shish Kebab

Diced lamb
Onions finely diced
Yogurt
Chilli powder
Aleppo pepper or Urfa Biber (smoked Turkish pepper)
Smoked paprika
Salt
Ground black pepper
Ground cumin
A few drops of lemon juice

Marinade for at least 6 hours and then put onto skewers

Light a BBQ with good lump-wood charcoal and let it get good and hot

Baba ganoush

Place the aubergines in the hot coals and let them burn until blackened and cooked through.
Scoop out the roasted aubergine, mash with a fork and add a crushed garlic clove, olive oil and salt.

Skewer up your lamb and cook over hot coals until it is just a little pink. Serve with flat bread and garlic labneh (or Greek yogurt)

Archaeologists-Who-Happen-to-be-Mothers

Kathryn Killackey, archaeological illustrator.
Kathryn Killackey, archaeological illustrator. Photo by Andrew Roddick.
Professor Nicky Milner, directing excavations at Star Carr.
Professor Nicky Milner, directing excavations at Star Carr.
Dr. Karen Holmberg, visiting scholar at NYU & volcano fetishist.
Dr. Karen Holmberg, visiting scholar at NYU & volcano fetishist.
Dr. Burcu Tung, directing excavations at Çatalhöyük.
Dr. Burcu Tung, directing excavations at Çatalhöyük. Photo by Scott Haddow.
Dr. Rebecca Wragg Sykes, honorary fellow at Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire PACEA,
Dr. Rebecca Wragg Sykes, honorary fellow at Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire PACEA

I initially started this photo essay with a long, considered discussion of motherhood in archaeology, how hard it is to fight against the structural forces that inhibit fieldwork and childcare, and how I have benefitted from incredible friends and colleagues who have acted as role-models and mentors. But in the end I deleted it. You don’t need me wittering on–just look at these archaeologists-who-happen-to-be-mothers.

Many of them hesitated to send photos, as it is an incredibly revealing act to expose what is perceived as a major hinderance to women’s careers. Even so, several of them also stated that they did so because they thought it was important to make this visible, to make it normal. I’m happy to say that this is only a small sample of the women I know who are archaeologists & mothers, so there is a great diversity of experience, support and wisdom that I’m lucky to receive.

Me at 27 weeks, surveying in Oman.
Me at 27 weeks, surveying in Oman.

I’m deeply grateful to these women and collecting these photos was a perfect way to start my maternity leave. If you’d like to contribute your own photos, please send them my way (clmorgan at gmail) or post them in the comments.