Archaeologists-Who-Happen-to-be-Mothers Part II!

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Dr. Virginia Rimmer Herrmann (University of Tübingen) at Zincirli Höyük, Turkey.

Alexis Dunlop, field archaeologist.

Alexis Dunlop, field archaeologist.

Dr. Jessica Thompson, Emory University, directing the Malawi Earlier-Middle Stone Age Project (MEMSAP).

Dr. Jessica Thompson, Emory University, directing the Malawi Earlier-Middle Stone Age Project (MEMSAP).

I received an incredible response from the last post, Archaeologists-Who-Happen-to-be-Mothers, not in the least in the form of the contributions of photos, videos, and thoughts about archaeology & motherhood. Many of the contributors acknowledged how difficult (if not impossible) it would be without a very supportive partner, flexible working schedules, and control over their working conditions in the field. I encourage you also to check out the comments on the last post, where you can see the diversity of experience in the personal stories coming through.

I consulted with Dr. Brenna Hassett of Team Trowelblazers and she recommended that we set up a Tumblr for submissions, simply:

Women Digging

There are several more submissions there, I urge you to check it out, and submit your own photos, either with children or doing fieldwork on your own. Alternately, you can still email me photos, stories, and videos at clmorgan at gmail.

The only caveat: we reserve the right to not post photos that are outside recommended Health & Safety procedures, such as unshored trenches over 1.2m, not wearing PPE around heavy machinery, and the like. Stay safe out there, women diggers!

3 responses to “Archaeologists-Who-Happen-to-be-Mothers Part II!

  1. Pingback: Archaeologists-Who-Happen-to-be-Mothers Part II! — Middle Savagery | Nicole A. Raslich

  2. A woman has to do what a woman has gotta do, hopefully they won’t run into any ole mummy’s though.

  3. And a few of us archaeologists happen to be Dads as well. Raising our own little scientists in the field; and it is just as difficult. I took my girl out on a project in sub-zero temperatures when she was nine weeks old and it it was the beginning of great things. It’s an excellent way to grow up, playing in screened backdirt, running a Total Station before you can drive a car, and learning the many aspects of data collection. Twenty years later, mine is an aspiring archaeologist herself, much to my surprise.

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